Article-of-the-Month: “TECHNIQUES USED in the TOP INDIVIDUAL and TEAM DEFENSIVE BREAKDOWN DRILLS”

TECHNIQUES  USED  IN  THE  TOP INDIVIDUAL  & 

TEAM  DEFENSIVE  BREAKDOWN  DRILLS

By Coach John Kimble

 

DRILL NUMBER 1A: The “Ball Defender Stance Breakdown Drill” (“Ball Stance”—When Ball-Handler has his dribble and is a triple definite threat.)

Place the ‘overplay’ foot in the proper positioning.

If ‘fanning’ the dribbler, have the inside foot up adjacent but to the inside of the dribbler’s inside foot.

Have the ‘dig hand’ (inside hand if ‘fanning’ the dribbler) at knee height with palm up to prevent the dribbler from a front cross-over dribbler. 

Have the opposite hand extended out waist high to discourage passing.

If the ball-handler raises the ball near his hand (to pass or to shoot), raise both hands to discourage the shot or the pass.

Do not lunge for the steal.

Keep the body balanced and ready to push off when the dribbler starts his dribble.

DRILL NUMBER 1B: The “Ball Defender Stance Breakdown Drill”

(“Work Stance”—When Ball-Handler has killed his dribble.)

Step up towards the ball-handler.

Yell “Work!! Work!! Work!!

Cross-face the arms and trace the ball with both hands and arms.

Chest-bump the ball-handler.

Do not give back ground the ball-handler has surrendered against the added defensive pressure.

DRILL NUMBER 2: The “Push-Push Breakdown Drill”

The feet are shoulder width apart with one foot staggered forward.

The back is straight.

The head is up.

One (dig) hand is knee height level with the palm facing up in a striking position.

The opposite hand is waist level with the palm out.

The foot that is opposite of the direction the defender is going is the foot that provides the power of the step by strongly pushing off in the particular direction the defender wants to go.

The foot that is nearest the direction the defender wants to go opens up slightly (along with the hips) and steps in that direction.

DRILL NUMBER 3: The “Push-n-Talk  Stance Breakdown Drill”

Always provides the power with the proper “push foot.”

When going backwards, the “trail hand” should be used as an antenna to “feel” for screens or teammates.

The “dig hand” remains in the same position.

When going laterally, that “extended hand” should be used as the same type of antenna used previously.

The defender that sees teammates in front of him becomes the “eyes and the mouth” for that teammate.

Every defender must communicate with teammates & be ready to “pull his teammates through” the congestion.

DRILL NUMBER 4A: The “Circle-Box-Out  Drill” (Vs. Shooter)

Defender on the “dummy” shooter sticks a hand up to “alter but not block the shot.”

That defender does not leave the ground until the shooter leaves the ground.

Do not foul a jump shooter.

When the shooter starts to follow his shot, the defender should make a front pivot directly into the path of the offensive rebounder to initiate contact.

After the front pivot, defender should maintain contact “butt to gut,” elbows “high & locked,” head up and hands up. 

His elbows are there to “hold” the opposition—not the hands.

The head should be kept up to find the ball. 

The hands should be up to grab the ball and to keep from holding the rebounder.

There should be short choppy steps to stay between the ball and the opposition.

 

DRILL NUMBER 4B: The “Circle-Box-Out  Drill” (‘1-Pass Away’)

If the defender is guarding an offensive player that is one pass away, that defender should anticipate that his man will go after the offensive rebound in the direction opposite of his denial stance.

Therefore, he should reverse pivot off of his back foot to make the initial contact.

After the reverse pivot, the defender should maintain contact “butt to gut,” elbows “high & locked,” head up and hands up. 

His elbows are there to “hold” the opposition—not the hands.

The head should be kept up to find the ball. 

The hands should be up to grab the ball and to keep from holding the rebounder.

There should be short choppy steps to stay between the ball and the opposition.

DRILL NUMBER 4C: The “Circle-Box-Out  Drill” (‘2 or More Perimeter Passes Away)

Since the defender is several steps away from his opponent, he must close out on him under control.

To take one direction away from his opponent, defender must close out by shading one shoulder to force the opponent to go where the defender wants him to go.

The defender can predict and then reverse pivot off of his back foot into the opponent’s path.

All defenders should make contact “butt to gut” and hands up.

His elbows are there to “hold” the opposition.

The hands should be up to grab the ball and to keep from holding the rebounder.

The head should be kept up to find the ball.

There should be short choppy steps to stay between the ball and the opposition.

 

 

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